NetCDF Operators

This post is an introduction to Linux-based climate data and NetCDF operators (CDOs or NCOs) which allow you to perform various operations on netNDF files through the command line. I found these commands to be really nifty when I was working with pre-industrial control runs from a GCM. The output was being written on daily timestep, across 1200 years, and for the whole world, so it was absolutely essential that I cut the size of the files down as much as I could before transferring to my own computer.

The official documentation and installation instructions for NCO can be found here and CDO here, but if you’re working on a supercomputer, the libraries will already likely be installed. I will outline how I used some of these functions for my pre-industrial runs.

Concatenation

Some of the NCO commands have size limits of 40 GB, so it’s important to use the right order of operations when processing your files, which will be different depending on your ultimate goal. My goal was to ultimately get the 500-hpa geopotential height anomalies across the whole 1200 year period for specifically the Western US. Assuming you have a directory with all the NetCDF files, the first goal is to concatenate the data, since my run was broken into many smaller files. The easiest way to do this is with the following command which will take all the netcdf files in the directory (using the *) and merge them into a file called merged_file.nc:

cdo mergetime *.nc merged_file.nc

Return Individual Monthly Files

When calculating anomalies, you will need to determine a mean geopotential height value for each of the 12 months, and then calculate daily deviations with respect to these months to obtain daily deviations. You can do this with the following command:

cdo splitmon merged_file.nc zg500.mon

This command will return 12 files of the form zg500.mon$i.nc.

Return Monthly Means and Daily Anomalies

The next step is to calculate a monthly mean for each of these files. For example, for January use:

cdo timmean zg500.mon1.nc zg500.mean.mon1.nc

Return Anomalies

Now we subtract the means from each monthly file to return the daily anomalies for each month, which will be of the form: zg500.mean.mon${i}.anom.nc. If you want to combine the last two steps into one loop, you can use the code below:

for i in $(seq 1 12)
do
  cdo timmean zg500.mon${i}.nc zg500.mean.mon${i}.nc
  cdo sub zg500.mon${i}.nc zg500.mean.mon${i}.nc zg500.mean.mon${i}.anom.nc
done 

Cut Down to Geographical Area of Interest

Finally, we need to cut down the data just to the Western US. We use ncks (NetCDF Kitchen Sink) from NCO, which is probably the most versatile of all the functions (hence the name). This command is one that has the 40 GB limit, which is why I had to wait until I had monthly files before I could cut them down geographically. We must first specify the variable of interest using the -v flag. In my case, I only had one variable to extract, but you can also extract multiple in one command. Then denote the range of latitude and longitude using the -d flags. It is very important to include the periods at the end of each lat/lon (even if your bounds are integers) otherwise the command does not work.

for i in $(seq 1 12)
do
  ncks -v zg500 -d lon,180.,260. -d lat,30.,60. zg500.mean.mon${i}.cut.anom.nc -o zg500.mean.mon${i}.cut.anom.region.nc
done 

Ultimately, you will get 12 files of the form: zg500.mean.mon${i}.cut.anom.region.nc. And that’s it! You can concatenate the monthly files back together and try to resort the data back into the correct sequence according to time. I was unsuccessful at finding a quick way to do this, but it is possible. I found it much easier to work on this within R. I imported each of the 12 anomaly files, assigned a time vector, concatenated each monthly anomaly matrix into a larger matrix and then sorted according to date. If your files are small enough by the end of the process, this likely is the easiest way to take care of resorting. Enjoy!

How to automate scripts on a cluster

There are several reasons why you might need to schedule or automate your scripts on a personal machine or a cluster:

  • You’re waiting for a job to finish before submitting another
  • You’d like to automate regular backups or cleanups of your data (e.g., move new data to another location or remove unnecessary output files)
  • You need to submit jobs to get around node limitations (e.g., you’d like to spread out the submissions over several days)
  • You need to retrieve regularly updated data (e.g., you have a model that uses daily precipitation data and you’d like to automatically collect them every day)

Cron is a utility program on Unix operating systems that allows you to schedule or repeat such tasks in the future. There’s a crontab file associated with every user in a cluster, where you’ll input all the information needed to schedule and automate your tasks. Note that not all clusters automatically allow their users to run cron jobs[1], for example, I can use it on the Reed Group’s Cube cluster, but not on XSEDE’s Comet.

To edit the crontab file associated with your user, type the following in your command line:

crontab -e

This will open a text editor (like Vim) which you can edit. To simply view your current crontab without editing, run:

crontab -l

Crontab syntax is made up of two parts: the timer indicating when to run and the command to run:

Source

The timer accepts five fields, indicating the time and day for the command to run:

  • Minute — minute of the hour, from 0 to 59
  • Hour — hour of the day, from 0 to 23
  • Day of the month — day of the month, from 1 to 31
  • Month — month of the year, from 1 to 12
  • Day of the week — day of the week, from 0 to 7

For example the following would execute script.sh on January 2nd at 9:00AM:

0 9 2 1 * /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Special characters are naturally very useful here, as they allow multiple execution times or ranges:

Asterisk (*) — to use all scheduling parameters in a field, for example, run the script, every day at midnight:

0 0 * * * /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Comma (,) — to use more than one scheduling parameter in a field, for example, run the script every day at midnight and 12PM:

0 0,12 * * * /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Slash (/) — to create predetermined time intervals, for example, run the script every four hours:

0 */4 * * * /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Hyphen (-) — to determine a range of values in a field, for example, run the script every minute during the first 10 minutes of every hour, every day

0-10 * * * * /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Hyphens and slashes can be combined, for example, to run a script every 5 minutes during the first 30 minutes of every hour, every day:

0-30/5 * * * * /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Last (L) — this character can only be used in the day-of-the-month and day-of-the-week fields to specify the last occurrence of something, for example the last day of the month (which could differ):

0 9 L * * /home/user/scripts/script.sh

or, to specify constructs such as “the last Friday” of a every month:

0 9 * * 5L /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Weekday ( W) — this character is only allowed on the day-of-month field and is used to determine the closest weekday to that day of the month. For instance, using “15W” indicates to cron to run the script on the nearest weekday to the 15th day of the month. If the 15th is a Saturday, the script will be executed on Friday the 14th. If the 15th is a Sunday, the script will be executed on Monday the 16th. If the 15th is a weekday, the script will be executed on the same day:

0 0 15W * * /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Hash (#) — this character is only allowed in the day-of-week field and is used to specify constructs such as the second Friday of every month:

0 0 * * 5#2 /home/user/scripts/script.sh

Lastly, if you’d like to be notified whenever a script is executed you can use the MAILTO parameter, with your email address.

The important thing to remember when running cron on a cluster (as opposed to your own machine) is that it will launch a shell that with a new clean environment (i.e., without the environment variables that are automatically applied when you log on an interactive shell) and it will likely not be able to recognize some commands or where your modules are. This can be easily addressed by sourcing your bash_rc or bash_profile from your home directory before running anything. You also need to remember that it will launch at your home directory and you need to specify the absolute path of the scripts to be executed, or change directory before executing them.

For example my crontab file on the Reed Group cluster looks like this:

#!/bin/bash
MAILTO=myemail@cornell.edu
00 10 * * * . $HOME/.bashrc; cd /directory/where/my/project/is; git pull; sbatch ./script.sh
30 10 * * * . $HOME/.bashrc; cd /directory/where/my/project/is; git add . ; git commit -m 'fetched data'; git push

This does the following:
Every day at 10am it sources my bashrc profile so it knows all my environment variables. It changes to the directory of my project and pulls from git any new updates to that project. It then submits a script using sbatch. I get an email at the same time, with the text that would that would have appeared in my command line had I executed these commands in an interactive node (i.e., the git information and a line saying Submitted batch job xxxxx).
Then, every day at 10:30 am, I commit and push the new data back to git.


[1] If you’re just a regular user on a cluster you might need to request to be granted access. If you have root privileges (say, on a personal machine), you need to edit your cron allow and deny files:

/etc/cron.allow
/etc/cron.deny

Parallel File Compressing in Linux

If you are dealing with big data and need to move them to different directories or archive them for long-term storage, you have to think about how you can do so efficiently. Without an efficient method, you will probably need to spend days organizing and finishing the work. There are several utilities that are popular for this task. I had more than 3 TB of data that I needed to move to free up some space on the disk, so I thought about a strategy for moving my files. My smallest subdirectory was about 175 GB, and it took about 2 hours to compress with normal tar and gzip. I realized that gzip has options for the level of compression and the speed of compression, which I did not know before. This can be helpful. I did a simple test with a smaller data set (about 1.94 GB) by applying different speed options from 1 to 9; 1 indicates the fastest but compression method, and 9 indicates the slowest but best compression method:

GZIP=-Option tar cvzf OUTPUT_FILE.tar.gz ./Paths_to_Archive/

Here is the result: the default is 6, but you can play with the speed option and, based on your priority, choose the timing and compression ratio. If your file or folder is much bigger than what I used here as an example, different speed options can really save you time. Here is the graph that I created from this experiment:

You can further speed it up using more than one core/processor. There is another available gzip version that compresses files/folders on multiple processors and cores.

tar cf - ./Paths_to_Archive | ./pigz-2.4/pigz -1 -p 20 > OUTPUT_FILE.tar.gz

In this case, I used “1” as the speed option and specified “20” possessors for the task, and the path where I downloaded the pigz. The good news is that you can write a simple bash script to run the same command on other nodes rather than on the login node. Therefore, you can use all the available possessors on a node without making the head node slow.

#!/bin/bash										
#SBATCH -t 24:00:00					
#SBATCH --job-name=test				
#SBATCH --mail-type=end				
#SBATCH -p normal					
#SBATCH --export=ALL				
#SBATCH --nodes=1			
#SBATCH --output="test.txt"				
#SBATCH --cpus-per-task=32

tar cf - ./Paths_to_Archive | ./pigz-2.4/pigz -1 -p 32 > OUTPUT_FILE.tar.gz

Save the lines above in a test.sh, and run it with sbatch test.sh.

I used a larger subset of my data (16.5 GB) to check different speed options on parallel, and here is the result: the slowest option was almost threefold faster (168 vs. 478 seconds) than my previous test on one possessor; however, my previous test folder was much smaller (1.96 vs. 16.5 GB).

More Terminal Schooling

You are probably asking yourself “and why do I need more terminal schooling?”. The short answer is: to not have to spend as much time as you do on the terminal, most of which spent (1) pushing arrow keys thousands of times per afternoon to move through a command or history of commands, (2) waiting for a command that takes forever to be done running before you can run anything else, (3) clicking all over the place on MobaXTerm and still feeling lost, (4) manually running the same command multiple times with different inputs, (5) typing the two-step verification token every time you want to change a “+” to a “-” on a file on a supercomputer, (6) waiting forever for a time-consuming run done in serial on a single core, and (7, 8, …) other useless and horribly frustrating chores. Below are some tricks to make your Linux work more efficient and reduce the time you spend on the terminal. From now on, I will use a “$” sign to indicate that what follows is a command typed in the terminal.

The tab autocomple is your best friend

When trying to do something with that file whose name is 5480458 characters long, be smart and don’t type the whole thing. Just type the first few letters and hit tab. If it doesn’t complete all the way it’s because there are multiple files whose names begin with the sequence of characters. In this case, hitting tab twice will return the names of all such files. The tab autocomplete works for commands as well.

Ctrl+r for search through previous commands

When on the terminal, hit ctrl+r to switch to reverse search mode. This works like a simple search function o a text document, but instead looking in your bash history file for commands you used over the last weeks or months. For example, if you hit ctrl+r and type sbatch it will fill the line with the last command you ran that contained the word sbatch. If you hit ctrl+r again, it will find the second last used command, and so on.

Vim basics to edit files on a system that requires two-step authentication

Vim is one the most useful things I have came across when it comes to working on supercomputers with two-step identity verification, in which case using MobaXTerm of VS Code requires typing a difference security code all the time. Instead of uploading a new version of a code file every time you want to make a simple change, just edit the file on the computer itself using Vim. To make simple edits on your files, there are very few commands you need to know.

To open a file with Vim from the terminal: $ vim <file name> or $ vim +10 <file name>, if you want to open the file and go straight to line 10.

Vim has two modes of operation: text-edit (for you to type whatever you want in the file) and command (replacement to clicking on file, edit, view, etc. on the top bar of notepad). When you open Vim, it will be in command mode.

To switch to text-edit mode, just hit either “a” or “i” (you should then see “– INSERT –” at the bottom of the screen). To return to command mode, hit escape (Esc). When in text-edit more, the keys “Home,” “End,” “Pg Up,” “Pg Dn,” “Backspace,” and “Delete” work just like on Notepad and MS Word.

When in command mode, save your file by typing :w + Enter, save and quite with :wq, and quit without saving with :q!. Commands for selecting, copying and pasting, finding and replacing, replacing just one character, deleting a line, and other more advanced tasks can be found here. There’s also a great cheatsheet for Vim here. Hint: once you learn some more five to ten commands, making complex edits on your file with Vim becomes blazingly fast.

Perform repetitive tasks on the terminal using one-line Bash for-loops.

Instead of manually typing a command for each operation you want to perform on a subset of files in a directory (“e.g., cp file<i>.csv directory300-400 for i from 300 to 399 , tar -xzvf myfile<i>.tar.gz, etc.), you can use a Bash for-loop if using the is not possible.

Consider a situation in which you have 10,000 files and want to move files number 200 to 299 to a certain directory. Using the wildcard “*” in this case wouldn’t be possible, as result_2<i>.csv would return result_2.csv, result_20.csv to result_29.csv, and result_2000.csv to result_2999.csv as well–sometimes you may be able to use Regex, but that’s another story. To move a subset of result files to a directory using a Bash for-loop, you can use the following syntax:

$ for i in {0..99}; do cp result_2$i results_200s/; done

Keep in mind that you can have multiple commands inside a for-loop by separating them with “;” and also nest for-loops.

Run a time-intensive command on the background with an “&” and keep doing your terminal work

Some commands may take a long time to run and render the terminal unusable until it’s complete. Instead of opening another instance of the terminal and login in again, you can send a command to the background by adding “&” at the end of it. For example, if you want to extract a tar file with dozens of thousands of files in it and keep doing your work as the files are extracted, just run:

$ tar -xzf my_large_file.tar.gz &

If you have a directory with several tar files and want to extract a few of them in parallel while doing your work, you can use the for-loop described above and add “&” to the end of the tar command inside the loop. BE CAREFUL, if your for-loop iterates over dozens or more files, you may end up with your terminal trying to run dozens or more tasks at once. I accidentally crashed the Cube once doing this.

Check what is currently running on the terminal using ps

To make sure you are not overloading the terminal by throwing too many processes at it, you can check what it is currently running by running the command ps. For example, if I run an program with MPI creating two processes and run ps before my program is done, it will return the following:

bernardoct@DESKTOP-J6145HK /mnt/c/Users/Bernardo/CLionProjects/WaterPaths
$ mpirun -n 2 ./triangleSimulation -I Tests/test_input_file_borg.wp &
[1] 6129     <-- this is the process ID
bernardoct@DESKTOP-J6145HK /mnt/c/Users/Bernardo/CLionProjects/WaterPaths
 $ ps
 PID TTY TIME CMD
 8 tty1 00:00:00 bash
 6129 tty1 00:00:00 mpirun    <-- notice the process ID 6129 again
 6134 tty1 00:00:00 triangleSimulat
 6135 tty1 00:00:00 triangleSimulat
 6136 tty1 00:00:00 ps

Check the output of a command running on the background

If you run a program on the background its output will not be printed on the screen. To know what’s happening with your program, send (to pipe) its output to a text file using the “>” symbol, which will be updated continuously as your program is running, and check it with cat <file name>, less +F<file name>, tail -n<file name>, or something similar. For example, if test_for_background.sh is a script that will print a number on the screen every one second, you could do the following (note the “> pipe.csv” in the first command):

bernardoct@DESKTOP-J6145HK /mnt/c/Users/Bernardo/CLionProjects/WaterPaths
 $ ./test_for_background.sh > pipe.csv &
 [1] 6191

bernardoct@DESKTOP-J6145HK /mnt/c/Users/Bernardo/CLionProjects/WaterPaths
 $ cat pipe.csv
 1
 2

bernardoct@DESKTOP-J6145HK /mnt/c/Users/Bernardo/CLionProjects/WaterPaths
 $ cat pipe.csv
 1
 2
 3

bernardoct@DESKTOP-J6145HK /mnt/c/Users/Bernardo/CLionProjects/WaterPaths
 $ tail -3 pipe.csv
 8
 9
 10

This is also extremely useful in situations when you want to run a command that takes long to run but whose outputs are normally displayed one time on the screen. For example, if you want to check the contents of a directory with thousands of files to search for a few specific files, you can pipe the output of ls to a file and send it to the background with ls > directory_contents.txt & and search the resulting text file for the file of interest.

System monitor: check core and memory usage with htop, or top if htop is not available

If ps does not provide enough information given your needs, such as if you’re trying to check if your multi-thread application is using the number of cores it should, you can try running htop instead. This will show on your screen something along the lines of the Performance view  of Windows’ Task Manager, but without the time plot. It will also show how much memory is being used, so that you do not accidentally shut down a node on an HPC system. If htop is not available, you can try top.

Running make in parallel with make -j for much shorter compiling time

If a C++ code is properly modularized, make can compile certain source code files in parallel. To do that, run make -j<number of cores> <rule in makefile>. For example, the following command would compile WaterPaths in parallel over four cores:

$ make -j4 gcc

For WaterPaths, make gcc takes 54s on the Cube, make -j4 gcc takes 15s, make -j8 gcc takes 9s, so the time and patience savings are real if you have to compile the code various times per day. To make your life simpler, you can add an alias to bash_aliases such as alias make='make -j4' (see below in section about .bash_aliases file). DO NOT USE MAKE -J ON NSF HPC SYSTEMS: it is against the rules. On the cube keep it to four cores or less not to disturb other users, but use all cores available if on the cloud or iterative section.

Check the size of files and directories using du -hs

The title above is quite self-explanatory. Running du -hs <file name> will tell you its size.

Check the data and time a file was created or last modified using the stat command

Also rather self-explanatory. Running stat <file name> is really useful if you cannot remember on which file you saved the output last time you ran your program.

Split large files into smaller chunks with the split command and put them back together with cat

This works for splitting a large text file into files with fewer lines, as well as for splitting large binary files (such as large tar files) so that you can, for example, upload them to GitHub or e-mail them to someone. To split a text file with 10,000 into ten files with 1,000 lines each, use:

 $ split -l 1000 myfile myfile_part

This will result in ten files called myfile_part00, myfile_part01, and so on with 1,000 lines each. Similarly, the command below would break a binary file into parts with 50 MB each:

 $ split -b 50m myfile myfile_part

To put all files back together in either case, run:

$ cat myfile_part* myfile

More information about the split command can be found in Joe’s post about it.

Checking your HPC submission history with `sacct`

Another quite sulf-explanatory tile. If you want to remember when you submitted something, such as to check if an output file resulted from this or that submission (see stat command), just run the command below in one line:

$ sacct -S 2019-09-18 -u bct52 --format=User,JobID,Jobname,start,end,elapsed,nnodes,nodelist,state

This will result in an output similar to the one below:

bct52 979 my_job 2019-09-10T21:48:30 2019-09-10T21:55:08 00:06:38 1 c0001 COMPLETED
bct52 980 skx_test_1 2019-09-11T01:44:08 2019-09-11T01:44:09 00:00:01 1 c0001 FAILED
bct52 981 skx_test_1 2019-09-11T01:44:33 2019-09-11T01:56:45 00:12:12 1 c0001 CANCELLED
bct52 1080 skx_test_4 2019-09-11T22:07:03 2019-09-11T22:08:39 00:01:36 4 c[0001-0004] COMPLETED
1080.0 orted 2019-09-11T22:08:38 2019-09-11T22:08:38 00:00:00 3 c[0002-0004] COMPLETED

Compare files with meld, fldiff, or diff

There are several programs to show the differences between text files. This is particularly useful when you want to see what the changes between different versions of the same file, normally a source code file. If you are on a computer running a Linux OS or have an X server like Xming installed, you can use meld and kdiff3 for pretty outputs on a nice GUI or fldiff to quickly handle a files with huge number of difference. Otherwise, diff will show you the differences in a cruder pure-terminal but still very much functional manner. The syntax for all of them is:

$ <command> <file1> <file2>

Except for diff, for which it is worth calling with the --color option:

$ diff --color <file1> <file2>

If cannot run a graphical user interface but is feeling fancy today, you can install the ydiff Python extension with (done just once):

$ python3 -m pip install --user ydiff 

and pipe diff’s output to it with the following:

$diff -u <file1> <file2> | python3 -m ydiff -s

This will show you the differences between two versions of a code file in a crystal clear, side by side, and colorized way.

Creating a .bashrc file for a terminal that’s easy to work with and good (or better) to look at

When we first login to several Linux systems the terminal is all black with white characters, in which it’s difficult find the commands you typed amidst all the output printed on the screen, and with limited autocomplete and history search. In short, it’s a real pain and you makes you long for Windows as much as for you long for your mother’s weekend dinner. There is, however, a way of making the terminal less of a pain to work with, which is by creating a file called .bashrc with the right contents in your home directory. Below is an example of a .bashrc file with the following features for you to just copy and paste in your home directory (e.g., /home/username/, or ~/ for short):

  • Colorize your username and show the directory you’re currently in, so that it’s easy to see when the output of a command ends and the next one begins–as in section “Checking the output of a command running on the background.”
  • Allow for a search function with the up and down arrow keys. This way, if you’re looking for all the times you typed a command starting with sbatch, you can just type “sba” and hit up arrow until you find the call you’re looking for.
  • A function that allows you to call extract and the compressed file will be extracted. No more need to tar with a bunch of options, unzip, unrar, etc. so long as you have all of them installed.
  • Colored man pages. This means that when you look for the documentation of a program using man, such as man cat to see all available options for the cat command, the output will be colorized.
  • A function called pretty_csv to let you see csv files in a convenient, organized and clean way from the terminal, without having to download it to your computer.
# .bashrc

# Source global definitions
if [ -f /etc/bashrc ]; then
. /etc/bashrc
fi

# Load aliases
if [ -f ~/.bash_aliases ]; then
. ~/.bash_aliases
fi

# Automatically added by module
shopt -s expand_aliases

if [ ! -z "$PS1" ]; then
PS1='\[\033[G\]\[\e]0;\w\a\]\n\[\e[1;32m\]\u@\h \[\e[33m\]\w\[\e[0m\]\n\$ '
bind '"\e[A":history-search-backward'
bind '"\e[B":history-search-forward'
fi

set show-all-if-ambiguous on
set completion-ignore-case on
export PATH=/usr/local/gcc-7.1/bin:$PATH
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/local/gcc-7.1/lib64:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH

history -a
export DISPLAY=localhost:0.0

sshd_status=$(service ssh status)
if [[ $sshd_status = *"is not running"* ]]; then
sudo service ssh --full-restart
fi

HISTSIZE=-1
HISTFILESIZE=-1

extract () {
if [ -f $1 ] ; then
case $1 in
*.tar.bz2)   tar xvjf $1    ;;
*.tar.gz)    tar xvzf $1    ;;
*.bz2)       bunzip2 $1     ;;
*.rar)       unrar x $1       ;;
*.gz)        gunzip $1      ;;
*.tar)       tar xvf $1     ;;
*.tbz2)      tar xvjf $1    ;;
*.tgz)       tar xvzf $1    ;;
*.zip)       unzip $1       ;;
*.Z)         uncompress $1  ;;
*.7z)        7z x $1        ;;
*)           echo "don't know how to extract '$1'..." ;;
esac
else
echo "'$1' is not a valid file!"
fi
}

# Colored man pages
export LESS_TERMCAP_mb=$'\E[01;31m'
export LESS_TERMCAP_md=$'\E[01;31m'
export LESS_TERMCAP_me=$'\E[0m'
export LESS_TERMCAP_se=$'\E[0m'
export LESS_TERMCAP_so=$'\E[01;44;33m'
export LESS_TERMCAP_ue=$'\E[0m'
export LESS_TERMCAP_us=$'\E[01;32m'

# Combine multiline commands into one in history
shopt -s cmdhist

# Ignore duplicates, ls without options and builtin commands
HISTCONTROL=ignoredups
export HISTIGNORE="&:ls:[bf]g:exit"

pretty_csv () {
cat "$1" | column -t -s, | less -S
}

There are several .bashrc example files online with all sorts of functionalities. Believe me, a nice .bashrc will make your life A LOT BETTER. Just copy and paste the above into a text file called .bashrc and sent it to your home directory in your local or HPC system terminal.

Make the terminal far less user-friendly and less archane by setting up a .bash_aliases file

You should also have a .bash_aliases file to significantly reduce typing and colorizing the output of commands you often use for ease of navigation. Just copy all the below into a file called .bash_aliases and copy into your home directory (e.g., /home/username/, or ~/ for short). This way, every time you run the command between the word “alias” and the “=” sign, the command after the “=”sign will be run.

alias ls='ls --color=tty'
alias ll='ls -l --color=auto'
alias lh='ls -al --color=auto'
alias lt='ls -alt --color=auto'
alias uu='sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade -y'
alias q='squeue -u '
alias qkill='scancel $(qselect -u bct52)'
alias csvd="awk -F, 'END {printf \"Number of Rows: %s\\nNumber of Columns: %s\\n\", NR, NF}'"
alias grep='grep --color=auto'                          #colorize grep output
alias gcc='gcc -fdiagnostics-color=always'                           #colorize gcc output
alias g++='g++ -fdiagnostics-color=always'                          #colorize g++ output
alias paper='cd /my/directory/with/my/beloved/paper/'
alias res='cd /my/directory/with/my/ok/results/'
alias diss='cd /my/directory/of/my/@#$%&/dissertation/'
alias aspell='aspell --lang=en --mode=tex check'
alias aspellall='find . -name "*.tex" -exec aspell --lang=en --mode=tex check "{}" \;'
alias make='make -j4'

Check for spelling mistakes in your Latex files using aspell

Command-line spell checker, you know what this is.

aspell --lang=en --mode=tex check'

To run aspell check on all the Latexfiles in a directory and its subdirectories, run:

find . -name "*.tex" -exec aspell --lang=en --mode=tex check "{}" \;

Easily share a directory on certain HPC systems with others working on the same project [Hint from Stampede 2]

Here’s a great way to set permissions recursively to share a directory named projdir with your research group:

$ lfs find projdir | xargs chmod g+rX

Using lfs is faster and less stressful on Lustre than a recursive chmod. The capital “X” assigns group execute permissions only to files and directories for which the owner has execute permissions.

Run find and replace in all files in a directory [Hint from Stampede 2]

Suppose you wish to remove all trailing blanks in your *.c and *.h files. You can use the find command with the sed command with in place editing and regular expressions to this. Starting in the current directory you can do:

$ find . -name *.[ch] -exec sed -i -e ‘s/ +$//’ {} \;

The find command locates all the *.c and *.h files in the current directory and below. The -exec option run the sed command replacing {} with the name of each file. The -i option tells sed to make the changes in place. The s/ +$// tells sed to replace one or blanks at the end of the line with nothing. The \; is required to let find know where the end of the text for the -exec option. Being an effective user of sed and find can make a great different in your productivity, so be sure to check Tina’s post about them.

Other post in this blog

Be sure to look at other posts in this blog, such as Jon Herman’s post about ssh, Bernardo’s post about other useful Linux commands organized by task to be performed, and Joe’s posts about grep (search inside multiple files) and cut.

Remote terminal environment using VS Code for Windows and Mac

On Windows machines, the application MobaXterm is a valuable tool for computing on virtual machines and working through SSH clients. David Gold’s blog post walks through the installation and use of this app, which works well in Windows environments.

Working remotely on my Mac laptop, I have been struggling to achieve the same workflow as in the office, with a Windows machine. Unfortunately, MobaXterm is not available for download on Mac OS. Looking for alternatives, I discovered that using VS Code with the “Remote – SSH” extension is a great replacement with significant advantages to MobaXterm, as it an SSH client interface and code editor in one.

A screenshot from my VS Code remote interface, with the graphical file browser on the left panel, the SSH server terminal on the bottom-right, and the VS Code editor on the top-right.

Here’s how you can set up a remote session on Mac (and Windows) using VS Code: 

  1. Install the VS Code application here. For installation help and a brief overview of the app, check out this video.
  2. With VS Code opened, go to View -> Extensions, and search “Remote – SSH.” Click on the extension and press the green “Install” button. You should see the message “This extension is enabled globally” appear. Check out this extension’s description below (I’ll run through the basics in this post).
  3. On the bottom left of your screen, there should be a small green box with two opposite pointing arrow heads. Click this.
The green box is the Remote – SSH extension.
  1. Choose the first pop-up option “Remote-SSH: Connect to host…” and then select “Add New SSH Host…”.
Click the first box and then the “Add New SSH Host” button to connect to your SSH client.
  1. Here, enter your remote SSH username@serverid (here at Cornell, this would be yournetid@thecube.cac.cornell.edu to connect to our remote computing cluster, the Cube).
  2. In the same pop-up window, click the remote server that you just added. A new window will open and prompt you to enter your password for the server.
  3. Now, you in are in your remote SSH environment. Click “Open folder…” and select “OK” to see your remote directory on the left. You can navigate through these files in your remote machine the same way as MobaXterm. Click View -> Terminal to see your SSH command line on the bottom of the screen (here’s where you can actually run the programs on your cluster).

Now using VS Code, you can install other extensions to aid in code editing in different languages (here’s an article with a few good ones for various uses). This environment has the same functionality as MobaXterm, without having to switch applications for editing code. Run your cluster programs in the terminal window and edit the code in the main VS Code editor!

More on simple Bash Shell scripts (examples of “find” and “sed”)

When you conduct a large ensemble of computer simulations with several scenarios, you are going to deal with many data, including inputs and outputs.  You also need to create several directories and subdirectories where you can put or generate the inputs and outputs for your model.  For example, you may want to run a cropping system model across a large region, for 3500 grid cells, and you need to feed your model with the input files for each grid cell. Each grid cell has its own weather, soil, crop and management input files. Or you may want to run your model 100,000 times and each time use one set of crop parameters as an input, to conduct a sensitivity analysis. Another common practice of large simulations is looking for any hidden error that happens during the simulations. For example, your running jobs might look normal, without any obvious crash, but you may still get some kind of “error” or “warning” in your log files. So, you need to find those runs, correct them, delete the wrong files and rerun them to have a full set of outputs. These tasks are basic but could be challenging and very time-consuming if you do not know how to complete them efficiently. Linux environment provides facilities that make our lives easier as Dave said in his blog post, and Bernardo also provided some examples for this type of task. Here are a few more instances of simple but useful commands with “find” and “sed.”

find

Sometimes, you want to know how many files with a specific pattern exist in all the subdirectories in a folder. You can type below command at the upper-level folder. “f” means files, and in front of the “name,” we specify the pattern—for example, files that start with “218”. Or we can look for all the files that have the specific extension [i.e. *.csv] or have a specific strings in their name [i.e. *yield*].

find . -type f -name "218*"

Then we can transfer the listed lines of results [-l] to a count function [wc] with pipe [|]:

find . -type f -name "218*" |  wc -l

You may want to find and delete all files with the specific pattern [i.e. 218_wheat.csv] in all directories in which they might exist. So, after we find the files, we can execute [exec] the remove command [rm]:

find . -type f -name "218_wheat*" -exec rm {} \;

If these files are located in different directories and we don’t want to delete them all, we can also filter the find results by specifying the pattern of path [i.e. output] and then delete them:

find . -type f -path "*/output/*" -name "218_wheat *" -exec rm {} \;

Sometimes, we need to find specific paths instead of files. For example, I have a text file, and I want to copy that into the “CO2” folder, which is located in the “Inputs” folders of several scenario folders:

find . -type d -path "*/Inputs/*" -name "CO2" -exec cp ../CO2_concentration_8.5.txt {} \;

 “d” means directories, so we are searching for directories that contain “Inputs” folder and end with “CO2” folder. Then, we execute the copy command [cp], which copies the text file into the found directories.

If we are looking for a specific string inside some files, we can combine “find” and “grep.” For example, here I am looking for any error file [*.err] that starts with “218cs” if it contains this specific warning: “unable to find”

find . -type f -name “218cs*.err” –exec grep -i “unable to find” {} \;

Or we can look for files that do not contain “success.”

find . -type f -name 218cs*.err" -exec grep -L "success" {} \;

sed

“sed” is a powerful text editor. Most of the time it is used to replace specific string in a text file:

sed -i 's/1295/1360/' 218cs.txt

Here, we insert [i] and substitute [s] a new string [1360] to replace it with the original string [1295]. There might be few duplication of “1295” in a file, and we may just want to replace one of them—for example, one located at line 5:

sed -i '5s/1295/1360/' 218cs.txt

There might be more modifications that have to be done, so we can add them in one line using “-e”:

sed -i -e '5s/1295/1360/' -e '32s/1196/1200/' -e '10s/default/1420/' 218cs.txt

find + sed

If you want to find specific text files (i.e., all the 218cs.txt files, inside RCP8.5 folders) and edit some lines in them by replacing them with new strings, this line will do it:

find . -type f -path "*/RCP8.5/*" -name "218*" -exec sed -i -e '5s/1295/1360/' -e '32s/1196/1200/' -e '10s/default/1420/'  {} \;

Sometimes, you want to replace an entire line in a text file with a long string, like a path, or keep some space in the new line. For example, I want to replace a line in a text file with the following line, which has the combination of space and a path:

“FORCING1         /home/fs02/pmr82_0001/tk662/calibration/451812118/forcings/data_”

For this modification, I am going to assign a name to this line and then replace it with the whole string that is located at line 119 in text files [global_param_default.txt], which are located in specific directories [with this pattern “RCP4.5/451812118”].

path_new="FORCING1	/home/fs02/pmr82_0001/tk662/calibration/451812118/forcings/data_"
find . -type f -path "*RCP4.5/451812118/*" -name "global_param_*" -exec sed -i "119s|.*|$path_new|" global_param_default.txt {} +

Sometimes, you want to add a new line at the specific position (i.e., line 275) to some text files (i.e., global_param_default.txt).

find . -type f -name " global_param_*" -exec sed -i "275i\OUTVAR    OUT_CROP_EVAP  %.4f OUT_TYPE_FLOAT  1" {} \; 

Now, all of the “global_param_default” files have a new line with this content: “OUTVAR    OUT_CROP_EVAP  %.4f OUT_TYPE_FLOAT  1”.

It is also possible that you want to use a specific section of a path and use it as a name of a variable or a file. For example, I am searching for directories that contain an “output” folder. This path would be one of the them: ./453911731_CCF/output/ Now, I want to extract “453911731” and use it as a new name for a file [output__46.34375_-119.90625] that is already inside that path:

for P in $(find . -type d -name "output"); do (new_name="$(echo "${P}"| sed -r 's/..(.{9}).*/\1/')" && cd "${P}" && mv output__46.34375_-119.90625 $ new_name); done

With this command line, we repeat the whole process for each directory (with “output” pattern) by using “for,” “do,” and “done.” At the beginning of the command, the first search result, which is a string of path, is assigned to the variable “P” by adding $ and () around “find” section .Then, the result of “sed –r” is going to be assigned to another variable [new_name]; “-r” in the sed command enables extended regular expressions.

With the “sed” command, we are extracting 9 characters after “./” and removing everything after 9 characters. Each “.” matches any single character. Parentheses are used to create a matching group. Number 9 means 9 occurrences of the character standing before (in this case “.” any character), and “\1” refers to the first matched substring

“&&” is used to chain commands together. “cd” allows you to change into a specified path, which is stored in $P, and “mv” renames the file in this path from “output__46.34375_-119.90625” to “453911731,” which is stored in $new_name.

Performing random seed analysis and runtime diagnostics with the serial Borg Matlab wrapper

Search with Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms (MOEAs) is inherently stochastic. MOEAs are initialized with a random population of solutions that serve as the starting point for the multiobjective search, if the algorithm gets “lucky”, the initial population may contain points in an advantageous region of the decision space  that give the algorithm a head start on the search. On the other hand, the initial population may only contain solutions in difficult regions of the decision space, which may slow the discovery of quality solutions. To overcome the effects of initial parameterization, we perform a random seed analysis which involves running an ensemble of searches, each starting with a randomly sampled set of initial conditions which we’ll here on refer to as a “random seed”. We combine search results across all random seeds to generate a “reference set” which contains only the best (Pareto non-dominated) solutions across the ensemble.

Tracking the algorithm’s performance during search is an important part of a random seed analysis. When we use MOEAs to solve real world problems (ie. problems that don’t have analytical solutions), we don’t know the true Pareto set a priori. To determine if an algorithm has discovered an acceptable approximation of the true Pareto set, we must measure it’s performance across the search, and only end our analysis if we can demonstrate the search has ceased improving (of course this is not criteria for true convergence as it is possible the algorithm has simply failed to find better solutions to the problem, this is why performing rigorous diagnostic studies such as Zatarain et al., 2016 is important for understanding how various MOEAs perform in real world problems). To measure MOEA search performance, we’ll use hypervolume , a metric that captures both convergence and diversity of a given approximation set (Knowles and Corne, 2002; Zitzler et al., 2003). Hypervolume represents the fraction of the objective space that is dominated by an approximation set, as shown in Figure 1 (from Zatarain et al., 2017). For more information on MOEA performance metrics, see Joe’s post from 2013.

hv

Figure 1: A 2 objective example of hypervolume from Zatarain et al,. 2017. To calculate hypervolume, an offset, delta, is taken from the bounds of the approximation set to construct a “reference point”. The hypervolume is a measure of the volume of the objective space between the approximation set and the reference point. A larger hypervolume indicates a better approximation set.

This post will demonstrate how to perform a random seed analysis and runtime diagnostics using the Matlab wrapper for the serial Borg MOEA (for background on the Borg MOEA, see Hadka and Reed, 2013). I’ll use the DTLZ2 3 objective test problem as an example, which tasks the algorithm with approximating a spherical Pareto-optimal front (Deb et al,. 2002). I’ve created a Github repository with relevant code, you can find it here.

In this demonstration, I’ll use the Matlab IDE and Bash shell scripts called from a Linux terminal (Window’s machines can use Cygwin, a free Linux emulator). If you are unfamiliar with using a Linux terminal, you can find a tutorial here. To perform runtime diagnostics, I’ll use the MOEAFramework, a Java library that you can download here (the demo version will work just fine for our purposes).

A modified Matlab wrapper that produces runtime files

In order to track search performance across time, we need snapshots of Borg’s archive during the search. In the parallel “master-worker” and “multi-master” versions of Borg, these snapshots are generated by the Borg C library in the form of “runtime” files. The snapshots provided by the runtime files contain information on the number of function evaluations completed (NFE), elapsed time, operator probabilities, number of improvements, number of restarts, population size, archive size and the decision variables and objectives within the archive itself.

To my knowledge, the current release of the serial Borg Matlab wrapper does not print runtime files. To perform runtime diagnostics, I had to modify the wrapper file, nativeborg.cpp. I’ve posted my edited version to the aforementioned Github repository.

Performing random seed analysis and runtime diagnostics

To perform a random seed analysis and runtime diagnostics with the Matlab wrapper, follow these steps:

1) Download the Borg MOEA and compile the Matlab wrapper

To request access to the Borg MOEA, complete step 2 of Jazmin’s introduction to Borg, found here . To run Borg with Matlab you must compile a MEX file, instructions for compiling for Windows can be found here, and here for Linux/Mac.

Once you’ve downloaded and compiled Borg for Matlab, clone the Github repository I’ve created and replace the nativeborg.cpp file from the Borg download with the edited version from the repository. Next, create three new folders in your working directory, one called “Runtime” and another called “Objectives” and the third called “metrics”. Make sure your working directory contains the following files:

  • borg.c
  • borg.h
  • mt19937ar.c
  • mt19937ar.h
  • nativeborg.cpp (version from the Git repository)
  • borg.m
  • DTLZ2.m (test problem code, supplied from Github repository)
  • calc_runtime_metrics.sh
  • append_hash.sh
  • MOEAFramework-2.12-Demo.jar

2) Use Matlab to run the Borg MOEA across an ensemble of random seeds

For this example we’ll use 10 seeds with 30,000 NFE each. We’ll print runtime snapshots every 500 NFE.

To run DTLZ2 across 10 seeds,  run the following script in Matlab:

for i = [1:10]
    [vars, objs, runtime] = borg(12,3,0, @DTLZ2, 30000, zeros(1,12),ones(1,12), [0.01, 0.01, 0.01], {'frequency',500, 'seed', i});
    objFile = sprintf('Objectives/DTLZ2_3_S%i.obj',i);
    dlmwrite(objFile, objs, 'Delimiter', ' ');
end

The for loop above iterates across 10 random initialization of the algorithm. The first line within the for loop calls the Borg MOEA and returns decision variables (vars), objective values (objs) and a struct with basic runtime information. This function will also produce a runtime file, which will be printed in the Runtime folder created earlier (more on this later).

The second line within the for loop creates a string containing the name of a file to store the seed’s objectives and the third line prints the final objectives to this file.

3) Calculate the reference set across random seeds using the MOEAFramework

The 10 .obj files created in step two containing the final archives from each random seed. For our analysis, we want to generate a “reference set” of the best solutions across all seeds. To generate this set, we’ll use built in tools from the MOEAFramework. The MOEAFramework requires that all .obj files have “#” at the end of the file, which is annoying to add in Matlab. To get around this, I’ve written a simple Bash script called “append_hash.sh”.

In your Linux terminal navigate to the working directory with your files (the folder just above Objectives) and run the Bash script like this:

 ./append_hash.sh 

Now that the hash tags have been appended to each .obj files, create an overall reference set by running the following command in your Linux Terminal.

java -cp MOEAFramework-2.12-Demo.jar org.moeaframework.analysis.sensitivity.ResultFileSeedMerger -d 3 -e 0.01,0.01,0.01 -o Borg_DTLZ2_3.reference Objectives/*.obj

This command calls the MOEAFramework’s ResultFileMerger tool, which will merge results across random seeds. The -d flag specifies the number of objectives in our problem (3), the -e flag specifies the epsilons for each objective (.01 for all 3 objectives), the -o flag specifies the name of our newly created reference set file and the Objectives/*.obj tells the MOEAFramework to merge all files in the Objectives folder that have the extension “.obj”. This command will generate a new file named “Borg_DTLZ2_3.reference”, which will contain 3 columns, each corresponding to one objective. If we load this file into matlab and plot, we get the following plot of our Pareto approximate set.

Reference_set_front

Figure 2: The reference set generated by the Borg Matlab wrapper using 30,000 NFE.

4) Calculate and visualize runtime hypervolumes

We now have a reference set representing the best solutions across our random seeds. A final step in our analysis is to examine runtime data to understand how the search progressed across function evaluations. We’ll again use the MOEAFramework to examine each seed’s hypervolume at the distinct runtime snapshots provided in the .runtime files. I’ve written a Bash script to call the MOEAFramework, which is provided in the Git repository as “calc_runtime_metrics.sh” and reproduced below:

#/bin/bash

NSEEDS=10
SEEDS=$(seq 1 ${NSEEDS})
JAVA_ARGS="-cp MOEAFramework-2.12-Demo.jar"

for SEED in ${SEEDS}
do
	java ${JAVA_ARGS} org.moeaframework.analysis.sensitivity.ResultFileEvaluator -d 3 -i ./Runtime/runtime_S${SEED}.runtime -r Borg_DTLZ2_3.reference -o ./metrics/Borg_DTLZ2_3_S${SEED}.metrics
done

To execute the script in your terminal enter:

./calc_runtime_metrics.sh

The above command will generate 10 .metrics files inside the metrics folder, each .metric file contains MOEA performance metrics for one randome seed, hypervolume is in the first column, each row represents a different runtime snapshot. It’s important to note that the hypervolume calculated by the MOEAFramework here is the absolute hypervolume, but what we really want in this situation is the relative hypervolume to the reference set (ie the hypervolume achieved at each runtime snapshot divided by the hypervolume of the reference set). To calculate the hypervolume of the reference set, follow the steps presented in step 2 of Jazmin’s blog post (linked here), and divide all runtime hypervolumes by this value.

To examine runtime peformance across random seeds, we can load each .metric file into Matlab and plot hypervolume against NFE. The runtime hypervolume for the DTLZ2  3 objective test case I ran is shown in Figure 3 below.

Runtime_hv

Figure 3: Runtime results for the DTLZ2 3 objective test case

Figure 3 shows that while there is some variance across the seeds, they all approach the hypervolume of the reference set after about 10,000 NFE. This leveling off of our search across many initial parameterizations indicates that our algorithm has likely converged to a final approximation of our Pareto set. If this plot had yielded hypervolumes that were still increasing after the 30,000 NFE, it would indicate that we need to extend our search to a higher number of NFE.

References

Deb, K., Thiele, L., Laumanns, M. Zitzler, E., 2002. Scalable multi-objective optimization test problems, Proceedings of the 2002 Congress on Evolutionary Computation. CEC’02, (1),  825-830

Hadka, D., Reed, P., 2013. Borg: an auto-adaptive many-objective evolutionary computing
framework. Evol. Comput. 21 (2), 231–259.

Knowles, J., Corne, D., 2002. On metrics for comparing nondominated sets. Evolutionary
Computation, 2002. CEC’02. Proceedings of the 2002 Congress on. 1. IEEE, pp. 711–716.

Zatarain Salazar, J., Reed, P.M., Herman, J.D., Giuliani, M., Castelletti, A., 2016. A diagnostic assessment of evolutionary algorithms for multi-objective surface water
reservoir control. Adv. Water Resour. 92, 172–185.

Zatarain Salazar, J. J., Reed, P.M., Quinn, J.D., Giuliani, M., Castelletti, A., 2017. Balancing exploration, uncertainty and computational demands in many objective reservoir optimization. Adv. Water Resour. 109, 196-210

Zitzler, E., Thiele, L., Laumanns, M., Fonseca, C.M., Da Fonseca, V.G., 2003. Performance
assessment of multiobjective optimizers: an analysis and review. IEEE Trans. Evol.
Comput. 7 (2), 117–132.

Simple Bash shell scripts that have made my life easier

I’ve recently been using Bash shell scripts to improve the efficiency of my workflow when working on Linux systems and I thought I would share some of them here. I’m fairly new to Linux so this post is not meant to be a comprehensive guide on how to write shell scripts rather, I hope the scripts in this post can serve as examples for those who may also be learning Linux and unsure of where or how to start writing shell scripts. I didn’t write any of these from scratch, most of the scripts are based off files shared with me by group members Julie Quinn, Bernardo Trindade and Jazmin Zatarian Salazar. If you’re interested in learning more about any of the commands used in these scripts I’ve put some references I found useful at the end of this post. If you’re more experienced in writing shell scripts, please feel free to put tips or suggestions in the comments.

1. A simple script for making directories

For my research I’m processing results of a monte carlo simulation for several solutions found through multi-objective search and I needed to make folders in several locations to store the output from each solution. My first instinct was to make each directory separately using the mkdir command in the command line, but this quickly got tedious. Instead I used a bash script to loop through all the solution numbers and create a new directory for each. For more on using loops in Bash, check out this reference.

#!/bin/bash#!/bin/bash

# This script will create directories named "Solution_*.txt" for
# a set of numbered solutions 

# specify solution numbers
SOLUTIONS=('162' '1077' '1713' '1725' '1939' '2191' '2290' '2360')

# create a variable to store the string "Solution_"
DIRECTORY="Solution_" 

# loop over solution numbers
for i in ${SOLUTIONS[@]}
do
# create a separate directory for each solution
mkdir $DIRECTORY${i}
done

2. Calling a Java function and saving the output

The MOEA framework is a tool written in Java with all sorts of cool functions. I used it to generate 1024 latin hypercube samples across a given range for each of the 8 solutions mentioned above. Using a shell script allows for you to easily set up the arguments needed for the MOEA framework, call the Java function and save the output to your desired file format. The MOEA framework’s tool spits out a .txt file, but this script uses the “sed” command to save it as a .csv file. More on “sed” can be found in the reference at the end of this post.

#!/bin/bash#!/bin/bash
# this shell script will call the MOEA framework's Latin Hypercube
# Sampling tool to create 1024 samples from a set of
# prespecified ranges for each of 8 solutions

# create variables to store Java arguments
JAVA_ARGS="-Xmx1g -classpath MOEAFramework-1.16-Executable.jar"
NUM_SAMPLES=1024
METHOD=latin

# these are the solutions we will create samples from
SOLUTIONS=('162' '1077' '1713' '1725' '1939' '2191' '2290' '2360')

# loop through solutions
for i in ${SOLUTIONS[@]}
do
    # define names for input (ranges) and output file names
    RANGES_FILENAME=${i}ranges.txt
    OUTPUT_FILENAME=Solution${i}_Samples.txt
    CSV_FILENAME=Solution${i}_Samples.csv

    # Call MOEA framework from JAVA using specified arguments to
    # create LHS Samples, specify OUTPUT_FILENAME as output
    java ${JAVA_ARGS} org.moeaframework.analysis.sensitivity.SampleGenerator -m ${METHOD} -n ${NUM_SAMPLES} -p ${RANGES_FILENAME} -o ${OUTPUT_FILENAME}

    # Use the sed command tocreate new comma separated values file
    # from original output .txt file
    sed 's/ /,/g' ${OUTPUT_FILENAME} &amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; ${CSV_FILENAME} 

    # remove .txt files
    rm $OUTPUT_FILENAME
done

3. A piping example

Piping allows you to link together programs by making the output from one program or function the input to another. The script below was originally written by my friend Shrutarshi Basu for a class project we were working on together. This script is made to process the output from the Borg MOEA for 9 random seeds of the DTLZ2 benchmarking problem across several different algorithmic configurations, seen in the code as “masters” (for more on this see Jazmin’s post here). In addition to calling Java tools from the MOEAframework, Basu uses piping to link the Linux commands “tac”, “sed”, “grep” and “cut”.  For more on each of these commands, see the links at the bottom of this post.


# loop over each of 9 seeds
for i in {0..9}
do
obj=DTLZ2_S${i}.obj
output=dtlz2.volume

# loop over masters
for m in $(seq 0 $1)
do
runtime=DTLZ2_S${i}_M${m}.runtime
mobj=DTLZ2_S${i}_M${m}.obj

# extract objectives from output
echo "Extracting objectives"
tac ${runtime} | sed -n '1,/\/\// p' | grep -v "//" | cut -d' ' -f15-19 | tac > ${mobj};
done

# combine objectives into one file
echo "Combining objectives"
java -cp ../../moea.jar org.moeaframework.analysis.sensitivity.ResultFileSeedMerger \
-d 5 -e 0.01,0.01,0.01,0.01,0.01 \
-o ${obj} DTLZ2_S${i}_M*.obj

# calculate the hypervolume
echo "Finding final hypervolume"
hvol=$(java -cp ../../moea.jar HypervolumeEval ${obj})

printf "%s %s\n" "$i" "$hvol" >> ${output}
echo "Done with seed $i"
done

Additional References and Links

 

Introduction to Docker

In this post we’ll learn the principles of Docker, and how to use Docker with large quantities of data in input / output.

1. What is Docker?

Docker is a way to build virtual machines from a file called the Docker file. That virtual machine can be built anywhere with the help of that Docker file, which makes Docker a great way to port models and the architecture that is used to run them (e.g., the Cube: yes, the Cube can be ported in that way, with the right Docker file, even though that is not the topic of this post). Building it creates an image (a file), and a container is a running instance of that image, where one can log on and work. By definition, containers are transient and removing does not affect the image.

2. Basic Docker commands

This part assumes that we already have a working Docker file. A docker file runs a series of instructions to build the container we want to work in.

To build a container for the WBM model from a Docker file, let us go to the folder where the Docker file is and enter:

docker build -t myimage -f Dockerfile .

The call docker build means that we want to run a Docker file; -t means that we name, or “tag” our image, here by giving it the name of “myimage”; -f specifies which Docker file we are using, in case there are several in the current folder, and “.” says that we run the Docker file and build the container in the current folder. Options -t and -f are optional in theory, but the tag -t is very important as it gives a name to your built image. If we don’t do that, we’ll have to go through the whole build every time we want to run a Docker container from the Docker file. This would waste a lot of time.

Once the Docker image is built, we can run it. In other words, have a virtual machine running on the computer / cluster / cloud where we are working. To do that, we enter:

docker run -dit myimage

The three options are as follows: -d means that we do not directly enter the container, and instead have it running in the background, while the call returns the containers hexadecimal ID. -i means that we keep the standard input open. Finally, -t is our tag, which is the name of the docker image (here, “myimage”).

We can now check that the image is running by listing all the running images with:

docker ps

In particular, this lists displays a list of hexadecimal IDs associated to each running image. After that, we can enter the container by typing:

 docker exec -i -t hexadecimalID /bin/bash 

where -i is the same as before, but -t now refers to the hexadecimal ID of the tagged image (that we retrieved with docker ps). The second argument /bin/bash simply sets the directory of the shell in a standard way.

Once in the container, we can run all the processes we want. Once we are ready to exit the container, we can exit it by typing… exit.

Once outside of the container, we can re-enter it as long as it still runs. If we want it to stop running, we use the following command to “kill” it (not my choice of words!):

 docker kill hexadecimalID 

A short cut to calling all these commands in succession is to use the following version of docker run:

 docker run -it myimage /bin/bash 

This command logs us onto the image as if we had typed run and exec at the same time (using the shell /bin/bash). Note that option -d is not used in this call. Also note that upon typing exit, we will not only exit the container, but also kill the running Docker image. This means that we don’t have to retrieve its hexadecimalID to log on to the image, nor to kill it.

Even if the container is not running any more, it can be re-started and re-entered by retrieving its hexadecimal ID. The docker ps command only lists running containers, so to list all the containers, including those that are no longer running, we type:

 docker ps -a

We can then restart and re-enter the container with the following commands:


docker restart hexadecimalID

docker exec -it hexadecimalID /bin/bash

Note the absence of options for docker restart. Once we are truly done with a container, it can be removed from the lists of previously running containers by using:

 docker rm hexadecimalID 

Note that you can only remove a container that is not running.

3. Working with large input / output data sets.

Building large quantities of data directly into the container when calling docker build has three major drawbacks. First, building the docker image will take much more time because we will need to transfer all that data every time we call docker build. This will waste a lot of time if we are tinkering with the structure of our container and are running the Docker file several times. Second, every container will take up a lot of space on the disk, which can prove problematic if we are not careful and have many containers for the same image (it is so easy to run new containers!). Third, output data will be generated within the container and will need to be copied to another place while still in the container.

An elegant workaround is to “mount” input and output directories to the container, by calling these folders with the -v option as we use the docker run command:

 docker run -it -v path/to/inputs -v path/to/outputs myimage /bin/bash 

or

 docker run -dit -v path/to/inputs -v path/to/outputs myimage 

The -v option is abbreviation for “volume”. This way, the inputs and outputs directories (set on the same host as the container) are used directly by the Docker image. If new outputs are produced, they can be added directly to the mounted output directory, and that data will be kept in that directory when exiting / killing the container. It is also worth noting that we don’t need to call -v again if we restart the container after killing it.

A side issue with Docker is how to manage user permissions on the outputs a container produces, but 1) that issue arises whether or not we use the -v option, and 2) this is a tale for another post.

Acknowledgements: thanks to Julie Quinn and Bernardo Trindade from this research group, who started exploring Docker right before me, making it that much easier for me to get started. Thanks also to the Cornell-based IT support of the Aristotle cloud, Bennet Wineholt and Brandon Baker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enhance your (Windows) remote terminal experience with MobaXterm

Jazmin and Julie recently introduced me to a helpful program for Windows called “MobaXterm” that has significantly sped up my workflow when running remotely on the Cube (our cluster here at Cornell). MobaXterm bills itself as an “all in one” toolbox for remote computing. The program’s interface includes a terminal window as well as a graphical SFTP browser. You can link the terminal to the SFTP browser so that as you move through folders on the terminal the browser follows you. The SFTP browser allows you to view and edit files using your text editor of choice on your windows desktop, a feature that I find quite helpful for making quick edits to shell scripts or pieces of code as go.

mobaxtermsnip

A screenshot of the MobaXterm interface. The graphical SFTP browser is on the left, while the terminal is on the right (note the checked box in the center of the left panel that links the browser to the terminal window).

 

You can set up a remote Cube session using MobaXterm with the following steps:

  1. Download MobaXterm using this link
  2.  Follow the installation instructions
  3. Open MobaXterm and select the “Session” icon in the upper left corner.
  4. In the session popup window, select a new SSH session in the upper left, enter “thecube.cac@cornell.edu” as the name of the remote host and enter your username.
  5. When the session opens, check the box below the SFTP browser on the left to link the browser to your terminal
  6. Run your stuff!

Note that for a Linux system, you can simply link your file browser window to your terminal window and get the same functionality as MobaXterm. MobaXterm is not available for Mac, but Cyberduck and Filezilla are decent alternatives. An alternative graphical SFTP browser for Windows is WinSCP, though I prefer MobaXterm because of its linked terminal/SFTP interface.

For those new to remote computing, ssh or UNIX commands in general, I’d recommend checking out the following posts to get familiar with running on a remote cluster: