Profiling your Python script using cProfile

Profiling refers to performing dynamic analysis on a script to measure its execution time, the execution time of its subcomponents, as well as how many times each subcomponent is being called. This produces data on where the script program is spending the most time, and can help with optimizing your script to minimize its execution time. This blog has had two past posts on profiling, one on C++ using Callgrind and one on Python using PyCharm. PyCharm is a Python IDE that’s very useful but unfortunately not free, so if you’re looking for some freeware profiling functionality in Python, this post is for you.

Python has a module called cProfile. A simple example on timing the multiplication of two matrices with cProfile:

import cProfile
import numpy as np

mat1 = ([1, 6, 3],[3, 6, 3],[2, 8, 3]) 
mat2 = ([2, 7, 6],[5, 4, 7],[6, 1, 9]) 
  
cProfile.run('np.dot(mat1,mat2)')

this should print out something like the following:

         4 function calls in 0.000 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method builtins.exec}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method numpy.core.multiarray.dot}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}

I have recently used cProfile on one of my own scripts which I’ll be using here to demonstrate how it can be used in your own work. I have a function called fish_game, which contained my model and took vars as input. This function also calls function hrvSTR which represented my action policy function (it’s extraneous to this post what these functions do exactly, one represents the system and the other represents a policy that we use to act on the system, you can see the full model here). The fish_game function was called by my optimization algorithm during optimization. Running cProfile on it produces this:

cProfile.run('fish_game(vars)',sort='cumulative')
         282814 function calls in 0.698 seconds

   Ordered by: cumulative time

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.698    0.698 {built-in method builtins.exec}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.698    0.698 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    0.166    0.166    0.698    0.698 <ipython-input-4-df258d5a749f>:55(fish_game)
    20200    0.385    0.000    0.531    0.000 <ipython-input-4-df258d5a749f>:1(hrvSTR)
    20200    0.016    0.000    0.089    0.000 fromnumeric.py:1821(sum)
    20200    0.021    0.000    0.069    0.000 fromnumeric.py:64(_wrapreduction)
   121208    0.055    0.000    0.055    0.000 {built-in method numpy.core.multiarray.zeros}
    20200    0.046    0.000    0.046    0.000 {method 'reduce' of 'numpy.ufunc' objects}
    20200    0.003    0.000    0.003    0.000 {built-in method builtins.isinstance}
    40400    0.003    0.000    0.003    0.000 {built-in method builtins.len}
    20200    0.002    0.000    0.002    0.000 {method 'items' of 'dict' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'normal' of 'mtrand.RandomState' objects}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}

This tells me one run of my function takes 0.698 seconds in total (this might vary slightly every time, depending on your processor usage at the time and other factors), and that most of that time, 0.531 seconds, are consumed by the hrvSTR function. Even though 0.7 seconds might not seem long, in the context of optimization, where this function would need to be evaluated tens of thousands of times, an additional 0.1 seconds might add hours of process time to your workflow. Trying to bring that down is probably a worthwhile investment of time that will result in time savings later on. As a result I figured there could be something I could do to reduce the time hrvSTR took. I particularly intrigued by the fact that some numpy process numpy.core.multiarray.zeros was called 121208 times, an order of magnitude more than every other method in my script, which prompted me to think that I might be unnecessarily repeating a process.

Looking at my code more closely (this is a script I have been using for more than a year now), I realized that I was ordering and normalizing and creating arrays for my action policy every single time it was called, something that was unnecessary, as the same policy was used for all time steps. I could instead perform all those steps once, save the outputs and use them for every time step instead of recalculating every time. I spent some time to adjust my script to do that and running cProfile again, produced this:

 cProfile.run('fish_game(vars)',sort='cumulative')
         79282 function calls in 0.379 seconds

   Ordered by: cumulative time

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.379    0.379 {built-in method builtins.exec}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.379    0.379 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    0.150    0.150    0.379    0.379 <ipython-input-16-3c528334eb55>:62(fish_game)
    19800    0.193    0.000    0.229    0.000 <ipython-input-16-3c528334eb55>:35(hrvSTR)
    59414    0.036    0.000    0.036    0.000 {built-in method numpy.core.multiarray.zeros}
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 fromnumeric.py:2817(mean)
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 _methods.py:58(_mean)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 <ipython-input-16-3c528334eb55>:4(generate_policy)
        6    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'reduce' of 'numpy.ufunc' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'normal' of 'mtrand.RandomState' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 fromnumeric.py:1821(sum)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 fromnumeric.py:64(_wrapreduction)
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method builtins.hasattr}
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 _methods.py:48(_count_reduce_items)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'clip' of 'numpy.generic' objects}
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 numeric.py:504(asanyarray)
       10    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method builtins.isinstance}
        8    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method builtins.issubclass}
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method numpy.core.multiarray.array}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'items' of 'dict' objects}
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method builtins.len}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}

I basically shaved 0.3 seconds off my function evaluation time by investing some time to look more closely at my script. If optimizing with 30000 function evaluations, this translates to some 2+ hours of processing time that I am saving (I spent far less figuring this out for the first time).

You can also run cProfile directly from the command line like so:

python -m cProfile -s cumtime fish_game.py

Using HDF5/zlib compression in NetCDF4, part 2: testing the compression settings

There has been a previous post, courtesy of Greg Garner, on why HDF5/zlib compression matters for NetCDF4. That post featured a plot that showed how much you could compress your data when increasing the compression level. But the fine print also acknowledged that this data was for a pretty idealized dataset. So how much should you compress your data in a real-world application? How can you test what your trade-off really is between compression and computing time?

Follow this 4-step process to find out!

I’ll be illustrating this post using my own experience with the Water Balance Model (WBM), a model developed at the University of New Hampshire and that has served for several high-profile papers over the years (including Nature and Science). This is the first time that this model, written in Perl, is being ported to another research group, with the goal of exploring its behavior when running large ensembles of inputs (which I am starting to do! Exciting, but a story for another post).

Step 1. Read the manual

There is a lot of different software for creating NetCDF data. Depending on the situation, you may have a say on which to use, or be already using the tool that comes with the software suite you are working with. Of course, in the latter case, you can always change the tools. But reasonable a first step before that is to test them. Ergo, look up the documentation for the software you are using, to see how you can control compression on them.

Here, WBM uses the PDL::NetCDF Perl library, which has useful functions for adding data to a NetCDF file after every time step the model runs. Contrary to Greg’s post that uses C and where there are two flags (“shuffle” and “deflate”) and a compression level parameter (“deflate_level”), for PDL::NetCDF there are only two parameters. The SHUFFLE flag is the equivalent in Perl of the “shuffle” flag in C. The DEFLATE Perl parameter ihas integer values from 0 to 9, with a value 0 being equivalent to the C-flag “deflate” being turned off, and any value from 1 to 9 being equivalent to the “deflate”C-flag being on, the value of DEFLATE being then equivalent to the value of the “deflate_level” parameter in Greg’s post. Therefore, the DEFLATE variable from the PDL::NetCDF library in Perl lumps together the parameters “deflate” and “deflate_level” used in C.

I then located the DEFLATE and SHUFFLE variables within the auxiliary functions of the WBM. In the function write_nc, the following two lines of codes are key:

 my $deflate = set_default($$options{DEFLATE},1); # NetCDF4 deflate (compression) parameter</pre>
my $shuffle = set_default($$options{SHUFFLE},0); # NetCDF4 shuffle parameter 

Step 2. Set up a test protocol

This builds on Greg’s idea of recording time and resulting file size for all compression level. Here we are interested in these quantities for full-scale model runs, and not just for the generation of a single NetCDF dataset.

In this case therefore, we want to contrast the default setting above with stronger compression settings, for ensemble runs of WBM on the Cube (the local HPC cluster). For a better comparison, let us place ourselves in the conditions in which ensemble runs will be made. Runs will use all 16 cores of a Cube node, therefore for each compression setting, this experiment runs 16 instances of the WBM on a single node. Each of the 16 instances runs on a single core. All WBM runs are identical so the only differences between run times and result file size come from compression settings.

Compression settings for (SHUFFLE,DEFLATE) are (0,1) by default, and we compare that with all settings from (1,1) to (1,9).

Step 3. Run experiment, get results

Here are the results from this experiment. Results consider 47 output fields for WBM runs with a daily time-step for 8 years (2009-2016), plus 5 years of warmup (this is pretty common for hydrological models). All this in a spatial mesh of 148,500 grid cells. A folder containing binaries for a single input variable, for this time span and spatial coverage, has a size of 3.1GB. Therefore, the expected size for 47 variables in binary format is 146Go. Let us compare with our results:

netcdf_expe_results

As one can see the presence of the shuffle flag or the value of the deflate parameter have little influence on the size of the results files. Compressed results are 3 to 4 time smaller than binaries, which highlights the interest of compressing, but also means we do not have the order(s) of magnitude differences reported by Greg’s blog post. This is mainly because the binary format used for WBM inputs is much more efficient than the uncompressed ASCII that Greg used in his experiment. For a deflate parameter of 9, there is an apparent problem within the PDL library, and no output (note that a single-core run with shuffle=0 and deflate=9 did not lead to a similar problem).

Step 4. Conclude on compression parameters

Here the epxerimental setup has shown that carefully selecting the output fields will save more space than fine-tuning NetCDF compression parameters. For instance, some of the 47 output fields above are fully redundant with others. Others are residual fields, and the only interest of looking them up is to verify that a major development within the WBM code did not mess up with the overall water balance.

More generally, the effects of compression are situation-specific and are not as great when there is no obvious regularity in the data (as is often the case with outputs from large models), or when the binary format used is already much better than ASCII. This said, NetCDF still occupies much less space than binaries, and is much easier to handle: WBM outputs are contained in one file per year (8 files total) with very useful metadata info…


 

 

C++ Training: Valgrind

Valgrind is a tool for “memory debugging” of programs. It allows you to find places where memory is not properly allocated, which are difficult to find using traditional debuggers. Valgrind should be one of the first steps that you take when testing a program — even a simple one! It is available on Penn State’s clusters, or available on Linux.

Here are some “fun” programming errors you should avoid that Valgrind will help catch:

Trying to write outside the bound

double *a;
length = 5;
a = new double[length]; //a is now an array of size 5
for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
{
   a[i] = i; //error at i=5
}

The program will let you write a value at a[5], even though the only legal places to write are a[0] through a[4]. This is a corruption, since a[5] refers to a place where memory could be used by another variable. Valgrind will yell at you for this, and rightly so. Also be careful when allocating 2d and 3d arrays, since it is easy to confuse rows and columns, which will cause you major headaches.

Memory Leaks Inside Functions

void fun()
{
   double *a;
   a = new double[5];
   return;
}

Although the variable a gets destroyed as you leave the function, the memory that you allocated here doesn’t get destroyed at all! This is dangerous, especially if you call fun() many times.

Conditional Jump Depends on Uninitialized Variables

Even if you allocate memory properly, you may unfortunately perform this horrible error:

int y; //uninitialized at first
int x = 6;
int *a;
a = new int[5];

if (x < 5)
{
   y = 2;
}

x[y] = 7; //error, since y is not initialized yet
delete a; //a is deallocated properly

Here we managed memory correctly, but we accessed y before it had a value assigned to it. The danger here is that y really has some garbage value (i.e., -58342671), so the program may “sometimes” call the line correctly, and sometimes it won’t. Valgrind to the rescue!

This tutorial explains how to start using it.