Globus Connect for Transferring Files Between Clusters and Your Computer

I recently learned about a service called Globus Online that allows you to easily transfer files to the cluster.  It’s similar to WinSCP or SSH, but the transfers can happen in the background and get resumed if they are interrupted.  It is supported by the University of Colorado: https://www.rc.colorado.edu/filetransfer and the NSF XSEDE machines: https://www.xsede.org/globus-online. Also, courtesy of Jon Herman, a note about Blue Waters: There is an endpoint called ncsa#NearLine where you can push your data for long-term storage (to avoid scratch purges). However on NearLine there is a per-user quota of 5TB. So if you find yourself mysteriously unable to transfer any more files, you’ll know why.

To get started, first create a Globus Online account.  Then, you’ll need to create “endpoints” on your account.  The obvious endpoint is, say, the cluster.  The University of Colorado for example has instructions on how to add their cluster to your account.  Then, you need to make your own computers an endpoint!  To do this, click Manage Endpoints then click “Add Globus Connect.”  Give your computer a name, and then it will generate a unique key that you can then use on the desktop application for the service.  Download the program for Mac, Unix, or Windows.  The cool thing is you can do this on all your computers.  For example I have a computer called MacBookAir, using OSX, and another one called MyWindows8 or something like that, that uses Windows.

File transfers are then initiated as usual, only you’re using a web interface instead of a standalone program.

As usual feel free to comment in the comments below.

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4 thoughts on “Globus Connect for Transferring Files Between Clusters and Your Computer

  1. Thanks Joe. A quick note for anyone doing this on Blue Waters. There is an endpoint called ncsa#NearLine where you can push your data for long-term storage (to avoid scratch purges). However on NearLine there is a per-user quota of 5TB. So if you find yourself mysteriously unable to transfer any more files, you’ll know why.

  2. Pingback: Compiling, running, and linking a simulation model to Borg: LRGV Example | Water Programming: A Collaborative Research Blog

  3. Pingback: Compiling MODFLOW2005 on the Janus computing cluster | Water Programming: A Collaborative Research Blog

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